About

Bio

Michelle Segar, PhD, MPH, motivation scientist and author of critically acclaimed “No Sweat! How the Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You a Lifetime of Fitness”(AMACOM 2015), is Director of the Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy Center (SHARP) at the University of Michigan, and Chair of the U.S. National Physical Activity Plan’s Communications Committee.  No Sweat was chosen as the #1 book in Diet/Exercise in 2015 by the USA Best Book Awards, and when released, it achieved the #1 selling Exercise & Fitness book on Amazon.  Michelle's 360-degree perspective is informed by more than two decades of award-winning research, individual fitness and self-care coaching, and consulting, uniquely positioning her to help organizations understand and leverage the emotional drivers and internal rewards of consumers’ decisions that lead to well-being and health.

Pioneering new approaches to sustainable behavior change in the fitness, health care, and wellness arenas, Segar's  evidence-based ideas about what motivates people to choose and maintain healthy behaviors is changing the conversation across fields. She consults with global organizations on these issues and delivers keynotes and sustainable behavior change trainings.

Her consulting and/or speaking clients include Adidas, Beaumont Health System, EXL, Google, Influence Health, Kaiser Permanente, National Business Group on Health, PepsiCo, Walmart, The University of Vermont Medical Center, and Zingerman's. She has a doctorate in Psychology (PhD) and master's degrees in Health Behavior/Health Education (MPH) and Kinesiology (MS) from the University of Michigan. Segar lives with her husband and son in Ann Arbor, and she loves walking, speaking Spanish, eating great food, and hanging out with friends and family. She ran with the Olympic Torch at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona.

Michelle's Path to Creating Sustainable Behavior Change

We’ve been taught to think about motivation in terms of “quantity” and how much of it people have – or don’t have. Thinking about motivation in this black-and-white way is not very helpful because it doesn’t address how to change it.

We’ve also been taught to think of motivation as the primary driver of behavior. Yet, research shows that motivation results from the main reason why individuals initiate any behavior change. The foundation of motivation is people’s primary reason for initiating that behavior.

Motivation isn’t the cause. It’s actually the result.

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